Patrols of the 1st Canadian Ranger Patrol Group

The patrols of the 1st Canadian Ranger Patrol Group are located throughout the Yukon, the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Atlin, B.C.

Rangers from this patrol participate in force employment tasks including sovereignty patrols, northern operations and monitor the North Warning System.

When not assisting with domestic operations, Rangers from the 1st Canadian Ranger Patrol Group regularly train in activities such as first aid, ground search and rescue, leadership, navigation, weapon safety and special training as required.

The Aklavik Patrol

Aklavik is a hamlet located in the Inuvik Region of the Northwest Territories with a population of 594. It is located at 68° 13' 13º N latitude, 135° 00' 42º W longitude, 113 km south of the Arctic Coast.

Aklavik is home to the Gwich'in and Inuvialuit First Nation.

Members of the community once harvested fish and muskrats to trade for goods from as far away as the Pacific and Arctic coasts.

Travel to Aklavik is limited to flight year-round except for the seasonal ice road from January until late March that stretches across the Mackenzie Delta to Inuvik.

The Aklavik Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Inuvik Patrol

Inuvik is an Inuit settlement located at 68° 21' 42° N 133° 43' 50° W, with a population of 3586. It is the administrative centre for the Inuvik region of the Northwest Territories. Located on the Mackenzie River, the town was started in 1953.

Inuvik is the northernmost point of Canada's highway system, being connected in 1979 by the completion of the Dempster Highway. The highway relies on ice roads in the winter and ferries in the summer to cross rivers, so the town is accessible only by air during the fall and spring periods when the ice is freezing or thawing.

The Arctic Bay Patrol

Arctic Bay is an Inuit hamlet located in the northern part of the Borden Peninsula on North Baffin Island in the Nunavut territory. It has a population of 690. It is located at 73° 2' 11º N latitude, 85° 9' 9º W longitude.

Arctic Bay is home to the Ikpiarjuk First Nation.

In the spring and summer time, marine mammals feed in the area, including narwhals, seals and walrus which are hunted by the residents.

Travel to Arctic Bay is limited to flight year-round.

The Iqaluit Patrol

Iqaluit is the territorial capital of Nunavut, and is located at 63° 44' 55° N 068° 31' 11° W, on Baffin Island and on Frobisher Bay. The only community with city status in the territory, Iqaluit has a population of 6184. The settlement was known as Frobisher Bay until 1987, and gained city status in 2001. Nunavut became an official territory in 1999. The name Iqaluit means “place of many fish" in Inuktitut.

Iqaluit is supplied by air and by sealift during the summer months. Cargo brought in by ship must be offloaded onto barges because the harbour isn't deep enough, but plans are in place for a deepwater harbour.

The Arviat Patrol

The Arviat Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1995.

Arviat is a predominantly Inuit hamlet located on the western shore of Hudson Bay in the Kivalliq Region of Nunavut. It has a population of 2060. It is located at 61° 06' 29° N latitude, 94° 03' 25° W longitude, close to the geographical centre of Canada.

Arviat is home to a traditionally Inuit Community.

Members of the community are hunters and fisherman. Wild life such as polar bears, migratory birds, beluga whales and caribou can be seen in this region.

Travel to Arviat is limited to flight and sealift year-round and by seasonal winter road from late January until late March.

The Kimmirut Patrol

Kimmirut, a hamlet in the Qikiqtaaluk region of Nunavut, is located at 62° 50' 48° N 069° 52' 07° W, on the south shore of Baffin Island. It has a population of 411. It started as an Anglican mission in 1909, followed by the Hudson Bay Company trading post in 1911 and RCMP post in 1915. The town is named for a geological feature located across the inlet which resembles a heel.

Most of the hamlet's residents are Inuit, and rely on subsistence harvesting of caribou, seals, walrus, whales and migratory birds.

Access to Kimmirut is by air, and it is supplied by sealift in the summer.

The Kimmirut Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program

The Atlin Patrol

The Atlin Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in March 1994.

Atlin is a community in northwestern British Columbia, Canada, located on the eastern shore of Atlin Lake. It has a population of 450. It is located at 59° 35' N latitude, 133° 43' W longitude, 250 km away from Whitehorse, Yukon.

Atlin is home to the Taku River Tlingit First Nation.

Members of the community were fisherman and hunters.

Travel to Atlin is done by flight or land year round. Travel by land is through Yukon Territorial Highway 7 which connects the Tagish Road and the Alaska Highway.

The Atlin Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger Program.

The Kugaaruk Patrol

Kugaaruk, a hamlet in the Kitikmeot region of Nunavut, located at 68° 31' 59° N 089° 49' 36° W, on the Simpson Peninsula. It has a population of 758. The community is situated on the shores of Pelly Bay and means “little stream" in Inuktituk.

The population of Kugaaruk is mostly Inuit, and most residents supplement their diet with traditional foods such as seal, caribou and arctic char. Kugaaruk features a modern school offering kindergarten to grade 12.

Like most northern communities, Kugaaruk can be reached only by air or sea, with an annual sealift during the summer bringing supplies.

The Kugaaruk Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Baker Lake Patrol

Baker Lake is a hamlet in the Kivalliq Region, in Nunavut on mainland Canada. It has a population of 1728. It is located at 64° 19' 05° N latitude, 96° 01' 03° W longitude, 320 km inland from Hudson Bay.

Baker Lake is home to eleven Inuit groups: the Ahiarmiut, the Akilinirmiut, the Hanningajurmiut, the Harvaqtuurmiut, the Hauniqturmiut, the luilirmiut, the Kihlirnirmiut, the Natsilingmiut, the Padlermiut, the Qaernermiut and the Utkuhiksalingmiut.

Members of the community were artists who became well-known for their wall hangings, basalt stone sculptures and stone cut prints.

Travel to Baker can be done by water in the summer and early fall or air year round.

The Kugluktuk Patrol

Kugluktuk, a hamlet in the Kitikmeot region of Nunavut, is located at 67° 49' 32° N 115° 05' 42° W, at the mouth of the Coppermine River. It has a population of 1302, up 7% from 2001. It was called Coppermine until 1996, when its name was changed to Kugluktuk.

The community, located on the shore of the Arctic Ocean, has a post office, a Northern Store, a co-op and two schools. The traditional language of the area is Inuinnaqtun.

Kugluktuk is accessible by air, and is supplied by an annual sealift.

The Kugluktuk Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Beaver Creek Patrol

Beaver Creek is a hamlet located in the Yukon Territory at 62° 10' 22° N 092° 34' 46° W. The community is situated on the Yukon-Alaska border, approximately 450 km northwest of Whitehorse. It is the westernmost settlement in Canada. Beaver Creek has a population of 88 residents.

Beaver Creek is home to the White River First Nation.

The first settlement at the current Beaver Creek site was a camp belonging to surveyors, mining interests developed in the 1940s, and the Alaska Highway was constructed in 1942.

The community is accessible by road from the Alaska Highway, and from the Beaver Creek airport.

The Lutsel K’e Patrol

The Lutsel K'e Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in October 1996.

Lutsel K'e, a hamlet in the South Slave region of the Northwest Territories, is located at 62° 24' 19° N 110° 44' 22° W, at the eastern end of Great Slave Lake. It has a population of 318. It was called Snowdrift until 1992.

The community is represented by the Lutsel K'e Dene First Nation, and has a post office, a small clinic and a school that goes up to grade 10. The traditional language of the area is Chipewayn.

Lutsel K'e is accessible by air, with scheduled service to Yellowknife, and boat. Sealift is provided from Hay River annually.

The Lutsel K'e Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Behchoko Patrol

Behchoko, in the North Slave region of the Northwest Territories, is located at 62° 48' 09° N 116° 02' 47° W, 80 km NW of the territorial capital Yellowknife. Behchoko has a population of 2026, mostly First Nations.

The town of Rae-Edzo is the largest Dene community in Canada.

Rae and Edzo are two towns approximately 6 km apart. Collectively they are known as Behchoko. The community is located on Marian Lake, off the North Arm of Great Slave Lake.

The community is served by the Rae-Edzo Airport, and accessible by road through the Yellowknife Highway.

The Mayo Patrol

The Mayo Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1991.

Mayo is located at 63° 35' 35° N 135° 53' 44° W, on the Stewart River and Silver Trail, in the Yukon Territory. It has a population of 248. The Stewart and Mayo rivers meet at the town, which used to be known as Mayo Landing.

Mayo is the home of the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun, whose primary language is Northern Tutchone. The town also has a nurse's station, an RCMP detachment and a post office.

Mayo is accessible by road on the Silver Trail, which connects to the Klondike Highway, or by air through the Mayo Airport.

The Mayo Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Cambridge Bay Patrol

Cambridge Bay is a hamlet located in the Kitikmeot Region of Nunavut, Canada. It has a population of 1477. It is located at 69° 07' 02° N latitude, 105° 03' 11° W longitude, at the southeast coast of Victoria island.

Cambridge Bay is home to the Inuit, Métis, and North American Indian.

Members of the community were hunters and fisherman. Barren-ground Caribou, muskox, Arctic char, lake trout and ringed seal were and remain the primary food sources.

Travel to Cambridge Bay is done by sealift and flight year-round except for a few months in the winter. From late January until late March a seasonal “Winter Road" links the community.

The Old Crow Patrol

Old Crow is located at 67° 34' 15° N 139° 48' 27° W, on the Porcupine River, in the far north of the Yukon Territory and has a population of 253.

The community belongs to the Vuntut Gwitch'in First Nation. They are dependent on the Porcupine caribou herd for meat and hides for clothing and other decorative items. The herd migrates every year to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska. Trapping and fishing also play a big role in the lives of the residents.

Old Crow is only accessible by air; it is the only community in the territory not accessible by road.

The Old Crow Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Cape Dorset Patrol

Cape Dorset is located on Dorset Island near Fox Peninsula, at the southern tip of Baffin Island in the Qikiqtaaluk Region of Nunavut, Canada. It has a population of 1236. It is located at 64° 13' 54° N latitude, 76° 32' 25° W longitude.

Cape Dorset is home to the Inuit First Nation.

Members of the community were artists whose main works were paintings, drawings, printmaking, and carving. Printmaking and carving remain the community's main economic activities.

Travel to Cape Dorset is limited to flight year-round except for a few months in the winter when a winter road links several communities.

The Cape Dorset Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Pangnirtung Patrol

Pangnirtung, in the Qikiqtaaluk region of Nunavut, is an Inuit hamlet located at 66° 08' 52° N 065° 41' 58° W, 300 km NE of the territorial capital Iqaluit. The hamlet is on Baffin Island, on the shore of the Pangnirtung Fjord, which joins the Cumberland Sound. It has a population of 1325.

Pangnirtung's largest industry is its turbot fishery. Federal funding for a new harbour was announced in 2009. Pangnirtung is also well known for its traditional art.

The hamlet is accessed by air through the Pangnirtung airport, and supplied by sealift annually.

The Pangnirtung Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Carcross Patrol

Carcross is an unincorporated community in the Territory of Yukon, Canada. It has a population of 431. It is located at 60° 10' 00° N latitude, 34° 42' 00° W longitude, 74 km south-southeast by the Alaska Highway and the Klondike Highway from Whitehorse.

Carcross is home to the Tlingit and Tagish First Nation.

Members of the community were hunters and fisherman. The main source of food in this area comes from Caribou hunting.

Travel to Carcross can either be done by air or land year round.

The Carcross Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Paulatuk Patrol

Paulatuk is a hamlet in the Inuvik region of the Northwest Territories. It is located at 69° 21' 05° N 124° 04' 10° W, 900 km NW of the territorial capital Yellowknife. The hamlet is on Darnley Bay, in the Amundsen Gulf. It has a population of 311.

The majority of residents are Inuit. Hunting, fishing and trapping form a large part of Paulatuk's economy, but traditional art is taking an increasingly important role. The community was first settled in the 1920s.

The hamlet is accessed by air through the Paulatuk airport, and supplied by sealift annually from Hay River.

The Paulatuk Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Carmacks Patrol

The Carmacks Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1992.

Carmacks is a picturesque community located at the confluence of the Nordenskiold and Yukon River. It has a population of 426. It is located at 62° 05' 20° N latitude, 136° 17' 20° W longitude, 180 km north of Whitehorse.

Carmacks is home to the Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation, a Northern Tutchone-speaking people.

Members of the community were mainly fisherman who relied mostly on the Yukon River and its rich salmon resources.

Travel to Carmacks can be done either by air or land year round.

The Carmack Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Pelly Crossing Patrol

The Pelly Crossing Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in March 1992.

Pelly Crossing, in the centre of the Yukon Territory, is a hamlet located at 62° 49' 59° N 136° 34' 59° W, 250 km north of the territorial capital Whitehorse. The community lies on the intersection of the Klondike Highway and the Pelly River. It has a population of 291.

The community is home to the Selkirk First Nation, and was established as a highway construction camp during the building of the Klondike Highway in 1950. The economy is based on hunting, fishing, trapping and guiding.

Pelly Crossing is accessible by air or road on the Klondike Highway.

The Pelly Crossing Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Chesterfield Inlet Patrol

The Chesterfield Inlet Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1988.

Chesterfield Inlet is located on the western shore of Hudson Bay, Kivalliq Region, in Nunavut Canada. It has a population of 332. It is located at 63° 20' 27° N latitude, 90° 42' 22° W longitude.

Chesterfield Inlet is home to the Qaernermiut First Nation.

Members of the community were mainly seal hunters. This activity predominantly took place in the late spring and early summer.

Travel to Chesterfield Inlet is done by air and sealift year round.

The Chesterfield Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger Program.

The Pond Inlet Patrol

Pond Inlet, in the Qikiqtaaluk region of Nunavut, is a predominantly Inuit hamlet located at 72° 41' 57° N 077° 57' 33° W, 1070 km north of the territorial capital Iqaluit. The community is at the northern end of Baffin Island, and has a population of 1315. It is the largest community above 72° N, and is named after the English astronomer John Pond.

The community features two schools, a co-op store, hotel and the largest employer is the government.

The town is accessible by air from Iqaluit and other supplies are brought in by an annual sealift. Cruise ships also visit during the summer when the inlet is ice free.

The Pond Inlet Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Clyde River Patrol

Clyde River is an Inuit hamlet located on the shore of Baffin Island's Patricia Bay, Nunavut. It has a population of 820. It is located at 70° 28' 26° N latitude, 68° 35' 10° W longitude, 750 km north of Iqaluit.

Clyde River is home to the Kangirqtugaapik First Nation.

Members of the community are renowned for their soapstone and whale-bone sculptures as well as their silk-screening designs.

Travel to Clyde River is limited to flight year-round except for a few months in the winter when a winter road links several communities.

The Clyde River Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Qikiqtarjuaq Patrol

Qikiqtarjuaq, in the Qikiqtaaluk region of Nunavut, is a predominantly Inuit hamlet located at 67° 33' 29° N 064° 01' 29° W, 470 km north of the territorial capital Iqaluit. The community is on an island in the Davis Strait, just off the east coast of Baffin Island.

Qikiqtarjuaq has a population of 473.

Qikiqtarjuaq features a hotel, a small RCMP detachment and a nurse station. A Distant Early Warning radar site was established in the 1950s, and is now the site of a North Warning System radar.

The community is served by the Qikiqtarjuaq airport, and supplied by annual sealift.

The Coral Harbour Patrol

Coral Harbour is a small Inuit community that is located on Southampton Island, Kivalliq Region, Nunavut. It has a population of 769. It is located at 64° 08' 13° N latitude, 83° 09' 51° W longitude.

Coral Harbour is home to the Sadlermiut First Nation.

Members of the community were hunters and fisherman. Traditional hunting activities included caribou hunting. Following the extinction of caribou on the island in the 1950s, more emphasis was place on marine mammals and birds.

Travel to Coral Harbour is limited to flight year-round.

The Coral Harbour Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Rankin Inlet Patrol

Rankin Inlet, in the Kivalliq region of Nunavut, is an Inuit hamlet located at 62° 48' 35° N 092° 05' 58° W, about 1200 km west of the territorial capital Iqaluit. The community is on the Kudlulik Peninsula, on the northwest side of Hudson Bay. Rankin Inlet has a population of 2358. It is the second largest community in Nunavut.

Historically, the area was inhabited by the Thule people, who hunted bowhead whales. They were succeeded by Caribou Inuit who hunted caribou and fished for arctic char on the coast. The town was established in the 1950s.

The hamlet is accessible by air through the Rankin Inlet Airport. It is supplied annually by sealift.

The Dawson Patrol

The Dawson Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1991.

Dawson is a town located about 536 kilometres northwest of Whitehorse, at the end of the Klondike Highway, Yukon. It has a population of 1327. It is located at 64° 03' 35.8° N latitude, 139° 24' 39.02° W longitude.

Dawson is home to the Hãn, and the Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in First Nation.

Members of the community were fisherman who relied heavily on the salmon runs of the Yukon River. They also hunted big game depending on seasonal needs.

Travel to Dawson can be done year long either by air or land.

The Dawson Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger Program.

The Repulse Bay Patrol

Repulse Bay, in the Kivalliq region of Nunavut, is a hamlet located at 66° 31’ 19° N 086° 14’ 06° W, about 900 km west of the territorial capital Iqaluit. The community is on the northwest side of Hudson Bay, lying exactly on the Arctic Circle. Repulse Bay has a population of 748.

Repulse Bay is home to Aboriginal Inuit, and Inuktitut is the first language of most residents. The area became a popular whaling ground in the late 1800s. Today, Repulse Bay residents depend on hunting, fishing and trapping for their living, as well as traditional art.

Access from outside is through the airport, and the community is supplied annually by sea.

The Deline Patrol

The Deline Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 2011.

Deline is located on the north shore of Keith Arm on Great Bear Lake at 65° 10° N latitude and 123° 25° W longitude. The community is 544 km northwest of Yellowknife. The current population is 565.

Both North Slavey and English are the language of choice. Deline is committed to preserving the traditional lifestyle. The economy is based on hunting, trapping and fishing. Tourism, oil and gas services, local services and arts and crafts are also part of the economy.

The community has limited air service from Norman Wells. Winter road access to Tulita is available.

The Resolute Patrol

Resolute, in the Kivalliq region of Nunavut, is a hamlet located at 74° 41' 51° N 094° 49' 56° W. The community is on the south coast of Cornwallis Island, on Resolute Bay and the Northwest Passage. Resolute has a population of 229.

About 80% of the residents of Resolute are Inuit. The community started life as an Air Force base and weather station during the Second World War.

Resolute can be accessed by air through the Resolute Bay Airport. Supplies are brought in annually by sealift. It is also home to the Canadian Forces Arctic Training Centre.

The Resolute Bay Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Faro Patrol

The Faro Canadian Ranger Patrol was established January 16, 2010.

Faro has a population of 350 and is located in the Central-South Eastern Region of the Yukon. It is located at 62° 13' 14° N latitude, 133° 20' 54° W longitude, 356 km northeast of Whitehorse.

Faro is home to the Kaska Dena First Nation.

Members of the community traditionally hunt in the Ross River area, an area which is well-known for being a prime moose-hunting spot.

Travelling to Faro is done year round either by car or airplane. Faro has an airport which is manned 7 days a week.

The Ross River Patrol

The Ross River Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1990.

Ross River, in the Yukon Territory, is a hamlet located at 61° 59' 41° N 132° 27' 01° W. Situated at the confluence of the Ross River and Pelly River, Ross River has a population of 337.

The community is home to the Ross River Dena Council, which represents the local Kaska people.

The first permanent settlement at the community's current location was a fur trading post built in 1901. In the 1950s, mining became the dominant economic activity with the opening of the nearby Faro lead-zinc mine, but this industry has declined in recent decades.

The Fort Good Hope Patrol

The Fort Good Hope Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1997.

Fort Good Hope is a charter community in the Sahtu Region of the Northwest Territories, Canada. It has a population of 557. It is located at 66° 15' 31° N latitude, 128° 37' 43° W longitude.

Fort Good Hope is home to the Sahtu Dene First Nation.

Hunting and trapping are the main sources of income of the members of the community.

Travel to Fort Good Hope is done by flight except for a few months in the winter.

The Fort Good Hope Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Sachs Harbour Patrol

The Sachs Harbour Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1988.

Sachs Harbour, in the Inuvik region of the Northwest Territories, is a hamlet located at 71° 59' 08° N 125° 14' 53° W. The community is situated on the south-western coast of Banks Island, approximately 500 km north of Inuvik, and has a population 122.

Fishing plays an important role in the community's economy, and it's home to the largest commercial muskox harvest in Canada. Sachs Harbour is the site of the Parks Canada Aulavik National Park visitor reception centre; the park itself is located on the north end of Banks Island.

The community is served by the Sachs Harbour airport, and by annual sealift.

The Sachs Harbour Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Fort McPherson Patrol

Fort McPherson is located in the Inuvik Region of the Northwest Territories, Canada. It has a population of 776. It is located at 67° 26' 07° N latitude, 134° 52' 55° W longitude, 121 km south of Inuvik.

Fort McPherson is home to the North American Indian, Métis, and Inuit First Nation. Beadwork of artists creates distinctive traditional items. Dene mukluks and other wares are made from a variety of skins including moose and caribou.

Travel to Fort McPherson is year round by road from Dawson City and Whitehorse, Yukon, with the exception of spring break-up and fall freeze-up on the Peel River.

The Fort McPherson Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Sanikiluaq Patrol

The Sanikiluaq Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1989.

Sanikiluaq, in the Qikiqtaaluk region of Nunavut, is an Inuit hamlet located at 56° 32' 34° N 079° 13' 30° W. The community is situated on the North Coast of Flaherty Island, approximately 1000 km southwest of Iqaluit and has a population 744.

The economy is based mostly on subsistence hunting and fishing. The islands were first discovered by Henry Hudson in 1610. In 1928 a Hudson Bay Company trading post was established on the north end of Flaherty Island.

The community can be reached by air, and supplies are brought in every summer by sealift.

The Sanikiluaq Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Fort Providence Patrol

Fort Providence, in the Dehcho region of the Northwest Territories, is a hamlet located at 62° 21' 17° N 117° 39' 36° W. The community is situated on the northeast bank of the Mackenzie River, 230 km southwest of Yellowknife. Fort Providence has a population of 759.

Fort Providence is home to the Dene. They are represented by Deh Gah Gotie Dene Council. The economy is based on traffic from the Mackenzie Highway, as well as tourism, traditional art and trapping in winter.

Fort Providence is accessible by air and road year round except for during thaw and freeze up. The Deh Cho Bridge is being built nearby, which will allow year-round crossing of the river.

The Fort Providence Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Taloyoak Patrol

Taloyoak, in the Kitikmeot region of Nunavut, is an Inuit hamlet located at 69° 32' 13° N 093° 13' 36° W. The community is situated on the Boothia Peninsula, approximately 460 km east of Cambridge Bay. Taloyoak has a population 809.

The community has a school with 270 students from kindergarten to grade 12. Young children are taught in Inuktitut, and the curriculum emphasizes traditional language.

Taloyoak is accessible only by air through the Taloyoak airport and a cargo aircraft arrives once a week. Annual resupply of non-perishable goods is by sealift during the summer.

The Taloyoak Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Fort Resolution Patrol

The Fort Resolution Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1992.

Fort Resolution is a "settlement corporation" in the South Slave Region of the Northwest Territories, Canada. It has a population of 484. It is located at 61° 10' 18° N latitude, 113 40 18 W longitude.

Fort Resolution is home to the Dene and Métis First Nation. Members of the community are engaged in fishing, moose hunting, and trapping of ptarmigan and rabbit year-round.

Travel to Fort Resolution can be done year long either by air or land.

The Fort Resolution Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Trout Lake Patrol

The Trout Lake Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in September 1998.

Trout Lake, in the Dehcho region of the Northwest Territories located at 60° 26' 33° N 121° 14' 43° W. The community is situated near the intersection of the British Columbia, Alberta and Northwest Territories borders, approximately 430 km southwest of Yellowknife. Trout Lake has a population 106.

Residents are First Nations, with the majority being part of the Dene Nation. The major sources of income for residents are hunting, fishing and trapping. A trading post was first established nearby in 1796, and the community became a permanent settlement in the 1960s.

Trout Lake is served by weekly charter plane into the airport, but it can be accessed during the winter months by ice road.

The Fort Simpson Patrol

The Fort Simpson Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1992.

Fort Simpson is a village in the Dehcho Region of the Northwest Territories, Canada. It has a population of 1216. It is located at 61° 51' 47° N latitude, 121° 21' 18° W longitude.

Fort Simpson is home to the Liidli Kue First Nation.

Members of the community were mostly fur-traders. Fort Simpson is the oldest continuously occupied trading post on the Mackenzie River.

Fort Simpson can be reached by air, water and road year round.  

The Tsiigehtchic Patrol

The Tsiigehtchic Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1992.

Tsiigehtchic, in the Inuvik region of the Northwest Territories, is located at 67° 26' 26° N 133° 44' 43° W. The community is situated at the confluence of the Mackenzie and the Arctic Red Rivers approximately 100 km south of Inuvik. Tsiigehtchic has a population of 136.

The Dempster Highway crosses the Mackenzie River at Tsiigehtchic, by ice road in the winter and by ferry during the summer. The river is impassable during the spring thaw and fall freeze. There is no permanent airport in Tsiigehtchic; it is one of the few communities in the territory to not have such a facility.

The Tsiigehtchic Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Fort Smith Patrol

The Fort Smith Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1992.

Fort Smith is a town in the South Slave Region of the Northwest Territories, on the Slave River and adjacent to the NWT/Alberta border. It has a population of 2364. It is located at 60° 00' 19° N latitude, 111° 53' 26° W longitude, 378 km southwest of Yellowknife.

Fort Smith has been occupied by the Dene, Cree and Chipewyan. Members of the community were fur-traders, hunting what was at one time a sizeable herd of wood bison.

Travel to Fort Smith can be done year long either by air or land.

The Tuktoyoaktuk Patrol

Tuktoyoaktuk, in the Inuvik region of the Northwest Territories, is an Inuit hamlet located at 69° 26' 34° N 133° 01' 52° W. The community is situated on the shore of the Arctic Ocean, on Kugmallit Bay, approximately 125 km north of Inuvik. Tuktoyoaktuk has a population of 870.

Many residents of Tuktoyoaktuk rely on hunting, fishing and trapping for their livelihood. In the 1950s, the construction of a Distant Early Warning radar provided employment. More recently discovery of large natural gas deposits has started to employ residents.

The community is served by the Tuktoyoaktuk airport and ice road from Inuvik during the winter.

The Tukoyoaktuk Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Gameti Patrol

Gameti is a community in the North Slave Region of the Northwest Territories, Canada. It has a population of 283. It is located at 64° 06' 44° N latitude, 117° 21' 13° W longitude.

Gameti is home to the Tlicho, First Nation.

Members used to be hunters, however today the economy is based on domestic fishing, hunting and trapping.

Travel to Gameti is limited to flight year-round except for a few months in the winter. From late January until late March a seasonal “ice road" is built.

The Tulita Patrol

The Tulita Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in November 1997.

Tulita, population 566, is a hamlet in the Sahtu region of the Northwest Territories, located at 64° 54' 01° N 125° 34' 39° W. The community is situated at the confluence of the Great Bear and Mackenzie Rivers, 75 km southeast of Norman Wells.

The residents of Tulita rely on hunting, fishing, trapping and traditional art for their livelihood. Oil and gas exploration and tourism are also significant economic activities.

Tulita is accessible year-round by air from Norman Wells. During the summer, supplies are brought in by barge from Hay River, and in the winter the community is linked to the Mackenzie Highway by ice road.

The Tulita Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Gjoa Haven Patrol

Gjoa Haven is a hamlet located in the Kitikmeot region of Nunavut with a population of 1064. It is situated at 68° 37' 33° N 095° 52' 30° W, approximately 1000 km northeast of Yellowknife.

Gjoa Haven is home to the Netsilik Inuit. The population of the hamlet has increased rapidly in recent years as people give up their traditional nomadic lifestyles in order to be closer to the healthcare and education facilities available in Gjoa Haven.

The community is served by the Gjoa Haven airport, as well as by sealift during the summer.

The Gjoa Haven Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Ulukhaktok Patrol

Ulukhaktok, in the Inuvik region of the Northwest Territories, is a hamlet located at 70° 44' 11°N 117° 46' 05° W. The community is situated on the west coast of Victoria Island, approximately 925 km north of Yellowknife. Ulukhaktok has a population of 451.

The primary means of subsistence for Ulukhaktok's residents are hunting, fishing and trapping. Printmaking is another major contributor to the local economy. The name Ulukhaktok refers to a nearby geologic formation where stones used to make ulus, or traditional cutting tools, can be found.

Year round access is available only by aircraft into the Ulukhaktok/Holman airport. The hamlet is supplied by sealift during the summer.

The Ulukhaktok Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Grise Fiord Patrol

Grise Fiord is a hamlet in the Qikiqtaaluk region of Nunavut with a population of 141. It is located at 76° 25' 03° N 082° 53' 38° W, and is the largest community on Ellesmere Island, as well as the northernmost civilian community in North America.

The original population of Grise Fiord consisted of Inuit relocated from Inukjuak, Quebec as part of the Canadian government's efforts to assert sovereignty in the arctic.

The community is accessible only by air and sea.

The Grise Fiord Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Watson Lake Patrol

The Watson Lake Canadian Ranger Patrol was established February 27, 2013 and is located at historical mile 635 at 60° 7′ 0″ N, 128° 48′ 0″ W on the Alaska Highway southeastern Yukon close to the British Columbia border. Population in 2011 was 802 (Statistics Canada).

The town of Watson Lake and the neighbouring Upper Liard settlement are the home of the Liard River First Nation, a member of the Kaska Dena Council. The Town owes its existence to two major factors: the construction of a military airport in 1941 and the construction of the Alaska Highway in 1942.

Situated in the rolling hills of southeast Yukon, Watson Lake is home to the famous Sign Post Forest, the incredible Northern Lights Space and Science Centre and the gateway to the exciting history and breathtaking scenery of Yukon.

Today, the Town of Watson Lake is the key transportation, communication and distribution center for mining and logging activities in the southern Yukon, Northern B.C. and a portion of the N.W.T. It also serves as a major service area for tourism during the summer months.

The Haines Junction Patrol

The Haines Junction Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in July 1990.

Haines Junction is a village located at 1632 km on the Alaska Highway, Yukon Territory. It has a population of 589, and is situated at 60° 45' 10° N 137° 30' 24° W.

The Southern Tutchone Aboriginal people have lived in the area for thousands of years. Discovery of gold nearby in 1903 led to a large-scale of influx of European prospectors, but they quickly moved on when the gold deposits proved to be very small. The present-day town began life as a construction camp for the US Army Corps of Engineers who were engaged in building the Alaska Highway.

The Haines Junction Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Wekweti Patrol

 The Wekweti Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1998.

Wekweti, in the North Slave region of the Northwest Territories, is a community located at 64° 11' 25°N 114° 10' 58° W. The community is situated on the Snare River, approximately 200 km north of Yellowknife. Wekweti has a population of 137.

The community is part of the Tlicho Government, and the residents are mostly Dene. Until 1998 it was known as Snare Lake. The majority of Wekweti's residents practice hunting, fishing and trapping.

The community has no permanent road access, but an ice road operates from January to March. People and cargo also arrive through Wekweti airport.

The Hall Beach Patrol

The Hall Beach Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in November 1990.

Hall Beach is an Inuit settlement located at 68° 46' 38° N 081° 13' 27° W, with a population of 654. It is in the Qikiqtaaluk region of Nunavut, on the Melville Peninsula and only 69 km away from Igloolik. Hall Beach is named after American explorer Charles Francis Hall. The community was established in 1957 during the construction of the Distant Early Warning radar site.

Hall Beach is accessible by air only. Caribou, walrus, arctic char, lake trout and snowy owls are some of the local wildlife species of interest.

The Hall Beach Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Wha tî Patrol

Wha tî, population 460, is in the North Slave region of the Northwest Territories, located at 63° 08' 40° N 117°16' 22° W. The community is situated on the shore of Lac La Martre, 160 km northwest of Yellowknife.

Hunting, fishing and trapping are the main economic activities of Wha tî. Recently, however, tourism has developed into an important industry. A fishing lodge was opened recently, and people come to see the abundant wildlife in the area.

The community has service to the Wha tî airport from Yellowknife, and an ice road connects it during the winter to the Mackenzie Highway at Behchoko.

The Wha tî Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Hay River Patrol

Known as "the Hub of the North," Hay River, population 3648, is located on the south shore of Great Slave Lake at the mouth of the Hay River at 60° 49' 59º N, 115° 46' 40º W. The town is in the South Slave Region, and is one of the regional centres for NWT.

The Hay River Dene Reserve and the West Point First Nation in Hay River preserve the Slavey and Chipewyan Dene heritage in the Hay River area. The area has been in use by First Nations, known as the Long Spear people, as far back as 7000 BC.

Hay River is accessible by air and road year round and receives many visitors during the summer months.

The Whale Cove Patrol

The Whale Cove Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in 1988.

Whale Cove, population 353, in the Kivalliq region of Nunavut, is a hamlet located at 62° 10' 22° N 092° 34' 46° W. The community is situated on the western shore of Hudson Bay, approximately 75 km south of Rankin Inlet.

The inhabitants of Whale Cove follow a traditional lifestyle, relying on hunting, fishing and trapping for subsistence. The beluga whales which gather nearby give the hamlet its name and provide a source of food and other products to the residents.

Whale Cove has no road access, travel is by air year round and supplies are brought in each summer by sealift.

The Whale Cove Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Igloolik Patrol

Igloolik is an Inuit settlement located at 69° 22' 34°N 081° 47' 58° W, with a population of 1538. It is in the Qikiqtaaluk region of Nunavut, on a small island near the Melville Peninsula and only 69 km away from Hall Beach. The name of the community refers to the sod houses that were originally in the area.

The first permanent occupation by southerners came in the 1930s with the establishment of a Catholic mission. The hamlet now has medical facilities, a school and an RCMP detachment.

Igloolik is accessible only by air and sea.

The Igloolik Ranger Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

The Whitehorse Patrol

The Whitehorse Canadian Ranger Patrol was established in November 1991.

Whitehorse, the capital of the Yukon Territory, is a city located at 60° 43' 00° N 135° 03' 00° W. The city is situated on the Alaska Highway and on shore of the Yukon River, approximately 100 km north of the British Columbia border. Whitehorse has a population of 20461. It is named after the White Horse Rapids, on the Yukon River.

Whitehorse is a fully modern city, with multiple schools, a hospital and many different recreational facilities. Tourism is a major industry for Whitehorse, which is renowned for its natural beauty.

Whitehorse is connected to Canada's highway system by the Alaska Highway, and is also accessible through the relatively large Whitehorse airport.

The Whitehorse Patrol also supports a Junior Canadian Ranger program.

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